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some americans? what difference at this point does it make? gwen: as the pentagon officially welcomed women into the ranks of combat warriors. >> at land and sea and in the air, we both wear the same uniform and fire the same weapons and most importantly, we all take the same oath. gwen: as republicans pondered reinvention. >> we have to stop being the stupid party. and it's time for a new republican party that talks like adults. >> and as congress geared up for a new battle. >> we're now going to focus on the real problem, which is not ththe tax too little but that we spend too much. >> the president's stared down the republicans. they blinked. gwen: the parties are over. now the hard part begins. covering the week, dan ball of "the washington post," martha raddatz of abc news, jeanne cummings of bloomberg news, and john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we'r
. androgel 1.62%. >>> a new poll finds the nation strongly in support of the pentagon's announcement that women will be able to serve combat roles in the military. gallup reports 74% in favor of the decision. and the numbers hold up when you break it down by sex. joining me now is mary jennings-hagar. she served two tours of duty in afghanistan, also injured in combat when the helicopter she was piloting was shot down. m.j., such a pleasure to have you on the back. >> good morning, alex. >> in life, as we all know, there are no guarantees of success. not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> and when you heard that, what did you think? >> that he completely understands where where we're coming from. that's what we're asking for. nobody is asking for fwaurn tgu positions many we're asked for the opportunity to compete, based on skill rather than gender. >> you are one of the women that brought the lawsuit. was it evident when you brought the case that the pentagon would change its stance? >> you know, alex, i have to be honest, i
of victory. or perhaps it would have happened anyway. but history was made at the pentagon this week which outgoing defense secretary leon panetta lifted the ban on women serving in direct combat. >> it's clear to all of us that women are contributing in unprecedented ways to the military's mission of defending the nation. women represent 15% of the force , over 200,000. the fact is that they have become an integral part of our ability to perform our mission. gwen: speaking of performing her mission, secretary of state hillary clinton went to capitol hill for the first time to talk about the americans killed in benghazi. >> as i have said many times, i take responsibility, and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger and more secure. gwen: we will get to the an and unanswered questions from secretary clinton's testimony in a moment. but first so many women already serving in combat. the question is, what practical effect, martha, will lifting this ban actually have? >> well, first of all, it can open hundr
by the pentagon when it was revealed that he sent e-mails to kelly that some officials found flirtatious. >> so the general allen situation, david, just your gut on that. what a mess. >> i don't know what the internet version of a tempest in a teapot is, but this is one where the pentagon, i think, rushed to investigate behavior, where there was very little evidence of wrongdoing. the fbi and the justice department had been reviewing all these e-mails, as part of their investigation of general petraeus. and they threw them all over the pentagon. the pentagon goes, geez, what do we do now? and they decided, gosh, i guess we better investigate them. so the inspector general at the pentagon was ordered by secretary panetta from his plane, he's traveling and says, gosh, we better do the investigation. so that's been rolling along. and there was never a thought to be evidence of real wrongdoing. general allen has been held up. he's our commander in kabul. he's a very fine general. and so it's good that this finally ended today. >> so what we've got, 9:00 eastern time, in about 15 minutes, the bengha
. >> well, new reaction today to the pentagon's decision to lift the ban on women in combat, which could open up thousands of front line military positions as soon as this year. some critics of the policy though they say that the mixing of genders on the battlefield is a dangerous experiment. advocates though say that the move -- women have already proved themselves in the line of fire. steve centanni is live in washington with more on this. hi, steve. >> that debate continues in women over combat. even though the policy has now changed to acknowledge the reality in today's military. women have been serving in certain combat roles for years. but with the stroke of the pen just last week. outgoing defense secretary leon panetta made it official. women can serve alongside men on the front lines. some opponents say this could lead to problems with unit cohesion and combat readiness. >> my issue here is mixing the genders in infantry units, armor units and special forces units is not a positive. there are many distracters there which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders, and actual
the 9/11 attacks. the hearing begins in a disagreement between the pentagon and the chief prosecutor in the case regarding the legality of some of the charges. attempts by the u.s. government to legitimatize these military tribunals have been complicated by the fact that the only two convictions of guantanamo bay prisoners via tribunals have been reversed by civilian appeals courts. the administration is also facing heat over its continued reliance on drone strikes. according to figures compiled by the london-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appoin
, the organization that bombed the new york city police department, the capital building and pentagon in the 1970's but that is not stopping a teachers grew from hand-picking bill ayers. he will address teacher educators next month in atlanta. ayers was involved in a townhouse bombing in new york city that left three people dead. >>steve: singer james taylor says he knows what gun owners want. >> i think the majority of us feel strongly, even the majority of gun owners feel strongly that we need to make some sacrifice to our freedoms if that's the way to put it. >>brian: is he wearing scalia's hat? >>steve: taylor made the comment after performing at the inauguration. advocates very concerned about the president's proposal on gun control if you take aspirin, it can triple your chances of going blind. those who take it on a regular basis can cause age related macular degeneration. >>gretchen: they tell you to take it for your heart and blood thinning. >>steve: the low dose. >>gretchen: watch this. a huge lighting fixture falls from above landing on the child during a meet in wisconsin. he had just g
. pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is "outfront." hillary clinton says it's risky to ignore this rising threat. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists. >> reporter: and the defense secretary sounds like a man ready to go on offense. >> we've got to go after al qaeda, wherever the hell they're at. and yes, in mali if necessary. >> reporter: but the white house is not embracing the same tough talk. >> we are working with france and support their effort in mali, and believe that the goal of preventing terrorists' safe haven is an important one. >> reporter: in public, the administration swings from forceful to tentative. a senior u.s. official said the defense secretary's tough talk is classic panetta. "he's letting the french know we've got their back in the offensive against al qaeda." u.s. military planes recently started landing in the capital, bringing 200 french troops and tons of the equipment to the fight. they're also sharing intelligence. but france is taking the lead, in a push to route out al qaeda from mal
. this is the great ironny. from the pentagon point of view, women are banned from ground combat. on the ground, women have been fighting in combat in iraq and afghanistan for ten years. >> host: was there a typical experience for women in iraq and afghanistan, for american soldiers? >> guest: um, it's hard to say "typical" because it really did vary depending on the year they were serving, where they were serving and who they were serving with. um, but the stories i did hear were the most common story i heard were ones of isolation. because, as i said, one in ten troops are women, but they don't necessarily get deployed together. so many women serve with a very small number of other women, vastly outnumbered by men, sometimes even alone. i've talked to women who were the only one serving with 60 men. the isolation of serving like that can lead to a lot of problems. from constant harassment and loneliness to sexual assault and rape. and i did hear a great deal more of those stories than i expected when i started my research. gls and that seems to be a common theme in "the lonely soldier," harassment,
-range ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead last month. >>> the pentagon meanwhile offering limited support to french troops as they continue to fight islamic militants in mali. transport planes are helping move men and gear into the west african country but officials insist the american footprint on the ground will stay small. france also asking for help refueling its warplanes but president obama has not yet made a decision on whether he will authorize the use of u.s. aerial tankers. he's asking for more information from france on its overall plans. the fear is that more u.s. involvement could endanger american personnel and facilities in the region if we come to be seen as a cocombatant in that conflict. then back here at home, national rifle association chief wayne lapierrre is keeping up his combative stance with president obama, now attacking the inaugural address. in a speech in reno last night lapierrre accused the president of attacking supporters of the second amendment saying universal background checks are good for two things, either taxing gun owners or taking their guns away.
, a new poll finds that the nation is strongly in support of the pentagon's announcement this week that women will now be able to serve in combat roles in the military. gallup report said 74% of people are in favor of the decision. those numbers hold up when you break them down by men and women as well. let me bring in democratic congress woman loretta sanchez, senior female member of the house armed services committee and homeland security committee. thank you so much for being here with us. why now is this time right time to do this? is it overdue would you say? is there something about it happening right now that's good timing? >> well, t.j., i've been fighting for about the last five or six years with a bill in the house to recognize what we already know. our women have been fighting in iraq and afghanistan. there is no frontline. everywhere is the frontline. they've been in combat. they've been killed. they're p.o.w.s. they've been wounded. and yet they have never received the recognition north pay nor the promotions due to the fact that they would be in combat. so it's long o
forward with about half of them on the pentagon. big impact on defense companies and defense stocks. neil: rich, edson, if you are still with me, while the president supports a simpler tax code, he will not do that at the expense of entitlements. very rare to state that in and address like this. it is more for a state of the union address. does that mean he has his fight on now. rich: he has not had any type of message that he would ever be willing to reduce the benefits that people receive. when you look at the inaugural address. these things do not stop our initiative. they strengthen us. they free us to take and make this country great. they defend these programs when you are looking at the debate with republicans on capitol hill looking for some type of restructuring going to the palm drive budget that has passed the house the last couple of years that would change the way that these entitlement function. on the other side, perhaps, the change in the way things are indexed. slowing the inflation of these types of things. outside of that, you are not getting any willingness from the ad
's terrible. in "the washington post," the number of people working on s cybersecurity for the pentagon is going to increase fivefold. the department of defense's cyber command which mainly focuses on kpourt systems is going to increase to nearly 5,000 troops and civilians. the retooled program will include combat mission forces who may help military commanders by disabling an encommand and control system before a military attack. tell us about it, richard. >> both cyber defense and cyber offense. you speak to anyone in the military in the intelligence community, this is the first thing they talk about. it's an area of great advantage for us. look at the way we use computer viruses. we can organize information in ways that others can't. on the other hand, everything we do as a society, everything we do as a military is now based upon cyber. so we're both the best but also the most vulnerable ultimately. so the idea that we're throwing enormous resources at this, this is no coincidence. it's not a one-time thing. this is now the future. >>> from our parade of papers, "the kansas city sta
the joint chiefs of staff. this was not imposed on them by any civilians in the pentagon or the white house. the joint chiefs recommended it because women are already in combat. let's start paying the ones who are in combat, what they deserve >> it is not like every woman in the military will be in combat. you've got to earn it. there's going to be tests. i mean come on, they're not just going to send people out there who aren't qualified. we don't have time to talk about hillary's testimony on the hill last week. just the floodgates of right wing misogyny that that opened up. preview of what's to come, i think. >> john: i think you're right eric. they had eight years of hating her as first lady. 12 years of loving her as a senator and secretary of state and now they're looking at 2016, they're going to hate her all over again to hurt her so chris christie, who they also hate, can become president. one more thing about the women in combat. there's so many men in the military who aren't fit for combat. there were so many women who are ready for combat and haven't been allowed to serve. i wan
a budget that is completely taken up by entitlements in the pentagon. and that will be the only thing we're capable of funding. it's the only thing we'll be able to use the power of some progressive government to try to change. you can't be -- i don't think you can be a really good advocate for education, if at the same time, you also don't make a powerful argument to get our priorities in order and make sure that we're capable, as a society, of responding to what we need to, because we are not fixed into a budget math problem that is so intractable as senator coburn says, that we sort of just drive off the edge. >> and michael, we have no money for discretionary domestic spending to invest in education, infrastructure, r&d. >> right. >> the things that government, we've grown to expect government to do, if we don't take care of medicare and medicaid. we say it time and time again, yet i get politicians on this show that still pretend that you can take care of waste, fraud, and abuse. and we'll take care of it. and they'll be selling some of the spectacle. >> and foreign aid. >> yeah, le
issues, particularly gay rights, were settled during his first term, when at the pentagon and throughout all military service, "don't ask, don't tell" was ended under his watch and he embraced formally for the first time gay marriage across the country. what arguments are to be settled for fought for in the future? climate change, immigration and tax reform among others. the president did at one point in his speech say there are some parts of government that need to be reformed, but our usefulness of one small olive branch to republicans. but we are not a nation of takers and the fundamental foundations of the great society, medicare, medicaid and social security will be preserved under his watch and the encroachments republicans would like to make on those programs from the president's perspective in the name of deficit reduction will be, if not repelled, at least resisted. scott? >> major, thank you very much. this is the crowd in washington, d.c., live, as they begin to wander away from the national mall, after witnessing american history firsthand. during the president's first inaugu
. it shall take a lot to pull this off. >> the pentagon has started to take steps to prepare itself for the sequestration and planning that has not taken place until now. >> they are laying off temporary employees. it is starting to happen. >> senator inhofe has been critical about not planning earlier. the >> there is a little brinkmanship going. i do believe there was a time and when each everybody said we are all against it so how can have them? there never was a path that the two sides could find that would lead them to averting it. >> the center was critical of the president in the stance of his overall military and mention three ways the president has worked for cuts, and delays, and additions to the military budget. when you talk to officers of line, and you find them as critical of the administration that what is: on average is very dramatic. this represents a huge threat to the united states. there are others that would argue it is more a regional. the ability to react is clearly limited. when you look at individual things, there are concernes. afghanistan is another issue.
military leaders the pentagon to cut from unsuccessful and outdated programs and put more money into the most successful and important programs. with that said, the only thing worse than the defense cuts and sequestration is no cuts at all. if we don't have the sequestration cuts at the top line revenue level went we will increase the debt ceiling with almost nothing to show for it. part of the reasons why the house republicans this week, extended the debt ceiling for three months to feel out paul ryan and his team to draft a budget that gets us balanced in 10 years but also protects the department of defense from further cuts because they have already been cut by $500 billion. >> do you get the idea, do you get the sense that americans are tired of world business. that doing some business here at home is gaining traction with people. are they world leadership weary? is the american hour ticking to a close? >> i think there is a degree of war weariness among the american people. it is not surprising. when your commander in chief is war weary you will be as well. when i was leadi
to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my grandfather could not vote. she says my family was beaten, we were slaves. we were literally slaves. she said today i feel free. i said, is it any different this time around from four years ago? she said it's even tweeter today because we have victory twice, so, yes, this is a crowd of believers and, yes, this is a
of war is -- jay johnson, the general kuns counsel of the pentagon, gave a speech about thinking about ending that war. we think about iraq and afghanistan. the hot wars. boots on the grounds wars. the broader framework of war under which we labor through the amf i agree with you the odds are slim that we're going to see a repeal of that, an end to that, but i think it's a place for the conversation to go in the second term as the president headed towards withdrawal with afghanistan and the physical presence we have of u.s. soldiers. >> as we start to understand what an obama foreign policy is. i mean, you look back at the first inaugural just compared with the second inaugural address. the first inaugural address was about ending the era of bush and cheney. that's really what it was about. it was about we're going to do this in i different way. if you unclench your fist. it's a different time now. he has to figure out what he is going to do affirmatively, not in reaction to the way somebody else did it that he disapproved of. >> look at the change in personnel. to go from gates to hil
to the pentagon, kerry to the state department and is lew as chief of staff. andrea mitchell, back outside. >> as people are leaving here, those nominations are pretty much expected to go through. of course, chuck hagel has been the most controversial. but this is really a cabinet and our friends doris kearns goodwin, of course, really has written so eloquently about the team of rivals approach of the first obama cabinet and the parallels, of course, to abraham lincoln. we think so much about lincoln today. we think about martin luther king jr. today and the all of the echos of equal rights that came through in the speech. but this is going to be a cabinet not of rivals, but of friends and colleagues, of very close colleagues and we see what we are expecting next, of course, janice mcdonough to be chief of staff. i think the president has a comfort level with these people and the question will be whether he listens to outside voices. he says he has huge challenges, but i thought that the tone of this speech was, aside from the policy prescriptions, much more eloquent than i had expected, f
was a sergeant, whom he believes comes at the pentagon from the view of the bottom of the ladder, not at the top of the ladder. and so i think you're going to have some real issues. >> general stanley mcchrystal wrote about that actually in his new book. he talked about the deficit of trust they had early on in the administration. let's go back to wolf, who is waiting down by the white house, down by the parade grounds. wolf? >> you can see the presidential limo, anderson, just beginning to move slowly. you see the secret service van right behind that presidential limo there. obviously very tight security. the vice president is there, and the president and the first lady. they are being accompanied by what is initially called the presidential escort. these are the parades, performing groups organized into five division, each led by one branch of the u.s. armed forces, the army, the marine corps, the navy and the air force and yes, the coast guard as well, even though the coast guard is part of the department of homeland security, not a part of the department of defense. it is one of the five bra
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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